by Cindy Bracker, Communications Director

Where do you currently live/work? Toquerville, Utah but will be moving soon to Cedar City, just up the road closer to where I teach, Southern Utah University. What do you like most about your job? OR  What do you like most about where you live? The landscape and clear skies. We live near Zion National Park and other desert Red Rock landscapes and in just a few minutes you can […]

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by Colin Sawyer

If it weren’t for ceramics, Peter Morgan would travel down the path of science, and study birds.  More specifically, the Harlequin Duck.  Peter is also a Minnesota Twins fan, as was evident with him wearing a Twin Cities cap during our interview.  Peter isn’t an artist to stay in one particular method of creation (press mold, slip cast, coiling, etc.).  Peter Morgan is one of NCECA’s Emerging Artist for 2016, […]

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by Naomi Clement

Attention All Students: The deadline is fast approaching for you to submit your application for both the Regina Brown Undergraduate Student Fellowship, and the NCECA Graduate Student Fellowship! Successful undergraduate applicants will be awarded $1,800 for use towards their proposed research project, and successful graduate applicants $2,000 (funds may not be put towards payment of tuition).  Don’t miss this incredible opportunity to receive funding to pursue your research. Applications for […]

Read More 0 like Comments Off on Student Fellowship Application Deadline Oct. 19!
by Hideo Mabuchi

Today’s featured image (full version below) shows four versions of a close-up view of one of the hexagonal alumina crystals we’ve been investigating over the past few weeks in microMondays.  The upper-left version of the image is what you see in the standard SEM backscattered-electron view, while the other three are created using a special tool on the electron microscope called an energy dispersing spectrometer (EDS).  The EDS tool makes […]

by Cindy Bracker, Communications Director

What do you get when you cross a brewer, a failed high school teacher, and a former advisor to Napoleon?  Either the setup for a really bad joke, OR one of the most misunderstood yet vitally important tools in the ceramics studio, the electric kiln.  Watch the “clay replay” video of David Sturm’s presentation from our 2016 conference and learn how and why electric kilns work, what the parts do, and what […]

by Steve Hilton

Over the years NCECA has been fortunate that there have been so many smart and caring individuals who have worked diligently to make our organization what it is today.  But it is that time again for some new volunteers to step forward and help advance NCECA’s mission and goals. It’s an incredible time as we have just taken our birthday hats off after celebrating our 50th anniversary in KC, and we’re […]

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by Hideo Mabuchi

This week’s featured image is a Scanning Electron Micrograph of another surface area from the “hexagons” sample we have been profiling since our first microMondays blog post.  In this image we see a number of small crystals all laying flat on the ceramic surface like tiny geometric tiles.  Some appear to be growing into each other, or even on top of one another.  It’s interesting to wonder whether features like this […]

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by Hideo Mabuchi

Our images this week show a zoomed-out view of the region of the ceramic sample containing the mullite “thicket” from last week.  I am often struck by the visual similarities between SEM images, which show very small patches of a fired ceramic surface, and aerial photographs of geographic landscape.  Cracks appear like roads or fissures in the ground; protruding crystals resemble hills, mountains, or volcanoes.  Of course, in a very rough sense, […]

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by Betsy Redelman

Greetings NCECA Pals! The NCECA Portland Team has been working hard to make our 2017 conference good and sustainable and we want you to go green with us! Check it out: Ideas for lessening your personal conference footprint this NCECA: 1) Take the MAX to and from the airport. There’s a MAX station right outside the doors of the Portland International Airport. The train is speedy and scenic and will take you right into the […]

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by Hideo Mabuchi

This week we feature another SEM image of the etched, fired ceramic surface we’ve been examining the past few weeks.  This view looks into a small pit/cavity with an overgrowth of plate-like crystals jumbled together with needle-like (acicular) crystals.  The needles are most likely composed of mullite, also known as porcelainite, an aluminosilicate material found commonly in fired ceramics.  A scale bar of one micron (one thousandth of a millimeter) is shown in the […]

by Shalya Marsh

NSJE application deadline is September 28th Are you a current undergraduate, graduate, or post-bac STUDENT? Stop procrastinating, and apply now for the National Student Juried Exhibition! This year’s exhibition will be held in conjunction with the 2017 conference Future Flux at the Hoffman Gallery at Oregon College of Art and Craft, March 4 – 28, 2017. Take the opportunity to have your work viewed by this year’s jurors, Linda Arbuckle […]

by Hideo Mabuchi

Last week we introduced the technique of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and posted an electron micrograph (SEM image) of a hexagonal alumina/hematite crystal formed in a “flashing” region on the surface of a ceramic vessel from an atmospheric firing.  We noted that SEM is capable of capturing images with resolution much finer than the limit of optical microscopy, which is roughly a few hundred nanometers.  In the gallery of images below, […]

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by Hideo Mabuchi

Today’s featured image was obtained using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM).  It shows a patch of micro/nano-crystals found on the etched surface of the sample discussed in last week’s post.  For scale, the edge of the hexagonal platelet located just to the right of and above center is about ten microns (one one-hundredth of a millimeter).  Those not familiar with electron microscopy may wonder why the image is monochrome and why we […]

by Cindy Bracker, Communications Director

Back to school season seems to be an ideal time to remind ourselves of Karen Atkinson’s popular session at the 2016 conference.  Get Your $h!t Together and get your semester started right!  Check it out below, and be sure to visit our YouTube channel for more conference session replays!