I hope you are just as excited as I am about this year’s conference in Portland! I’m not sure what I’m looking forward to most – the great conference programing, all the amazing exhibitions, seeing old friends, or the chance to visit Portland itself! I am however, especially excited about the opportunity for students to critique with professional artists and educators from around the country.  The Student Critique Room gives […]

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Not only is our upcoming conference upon us, we find ourselves in need of new Board members for the 2017-2020 term. So, it is election time again for NCECA, and we hope all of our members will participate by casting their vote to help us fill our soon-to-be vacant Board positions for a Director at Large and a Student Director at Large. It is now our fourth year with electronic […]

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Hey Clay Lovers! NCECA is right around the corner. We know you’re already laying out your conference outfits and figuring out a game plan for how to be first in line at the cup sale this year– BUT! There’s another bandwagon you should be jumping on. …Well, more of a bus actually. Here’s the run-down of the top-notch bus tours NCECA has going this year– The Portland Suburban Tour * This tour will take […]

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We are thrilled to share that 4 full-length videos of the 2016 Demonstrator Duos are complete and will be on sale and ready for you to take home from the 2017 conference in Portland!  Here’s a glimpse of what you will get:            

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Arriving in Portland Visitors flying in will arrive at PDX Airport, consistently rated the best airport in the USA (and for good reason). It has a wide array of locally-owned, reasonably-priced food options, so plan to take meals there if you happen to arrive at lunch or dinner. It also has a distillery shop (yes, really). Outside security, there’s also a branch of Real Mother Goose Art Gallery, Powell’s Books, […]

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Hopefully you’ve already booked your accommodations for NCECA, as many hotels are already booked up.  In case you haven’t, or in case you’re looking for alternatives, this article will provide you with some ideas and information. The first thing to understand is that the Oregon Convention Center (OCC) is located on the East side of the Willamette River, just across the water from downtown Portland.  The area adjacent to the […]

Yes. We’re back. If you’re given five minutes to tell a ClayStory, what story would you tell? We want to hear you tell it live, on stage, at NCECA 2017! Please join your hosts Lee Burningham and me for ClayStories 3 in Portland!!!!!! The 90 minute event is scheduled for 5:30pm on Friday, March 24, in the Portland Convention Center. A dozen or so potters will be given a maximum […]

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Today’s featured image shows a low-magnification SEM view of the cone 8 reduction cooled sample we introduced two weeks ago.  If you compare today’s image with the camera image from that post, you should be able to see that the brighter red patches in the camera image correspond to the more highly textured parts of today’s SEM image.  In upcoming posts we’ll show higher magnification SEM images to examine their […]

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In last week’s post we introduced a new surface sample of a high-iron stoneware piece by Dan Murphy that was wood fired to cone 8 and reduction cooled.  Today’s featured post shows a close-up image of this sample taken with a high power optical microscope under bright, direct illumination.  At the end of this post you can find a high resolution graphic that shows the location of this microscope image in relation to […]

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This week we shift our focus to a new surface sample, taken from a piece by Dan Murphy (Utah State University).  The clay is a high-iron stoneware body and the piece was wood-fired to cone 8 and reduction cooled.  Today’s featured image shows a close-up of a typical surface feature on this piece — a “splotch” of brighter red-orange color sitting on a darker purple-black background.  Looking at the piece by […]

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Where do you currently live/work?  I reside in Portland, Oregon and am the co-founder/ co-owner Mudshark Studios, Eutectic Gallery, Portland Growler Company, Kept Goods, and The Clay Compound What do you like most about your job? OR  What do you like most about where you live? I wear many different hats: At Mudshark, I love that we are continually solving problems and trying new things. with every email or phone […]

I had the pleasure to chat yesterday with Dr. Bill Carty from Alfred University about the story of the alumina/hematite hexagons that I learned from the Kusano et al. paper, which we’ve been exploring here in the microMondays blog posts.  Bill was most surprised by the part about the alumina hexagons crystallizing out of the melt, as the formation of only mullite crystals would be expected in the cooling of a […]

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Where do you currently live/work? I’m a Graduate Student and Teaching Assistant at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, LA. What do you like most about your job? OR  What do you like most about where you live? As a Canadian, I never imagined that I would be living in the deep south! It’s obviously drastically different from where I grew up (people, politics, weather etc.) but ultimately I love […]

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Today’s featured image is a “small” image in that it is only 256×256 pixels, but it conveys a lot of information!  Last week we discussed how the EDS (Energy-Dispersive Spectroscopy) tool on an electron microscope can provide information on not only the topography but the elemental composition of microscopic features on a ceramic surface, but we noted that the spatial resolution of this technique is insufficient to provide strong evidence […]