NCECA Emerging Artists 2017

NCECA Emerging Artists 2017

The National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts has selected the 2017 Emerging Artists. This year’s applicant pool was outstanding, which made it that much more challenging for the jurors to make our final selections.

This year the jury was comprised of Kim Dickey, Professor University of Colorado-Boulder, Tony Marsh, Professor- California State University- Long Beach, and Jane Shellenbarger, Assistant Professor-Rochester Institute of Technology.

The Six selected Artists:

 

Jessica Brandl

Jessica Brandl is a ceramics artist born in Austin Texas. She was raised amidst motorcycle culture with its love of the open road and rides without destination.  While a senior in high school both of her parents were killed while on an out of state motorcycle trip. Through the generous support of her hometown in Seward Nebraska and organized fundraising events put on by many local motorcycle clubs, Jessica was able to attend The Kansas City Art Institute in the fall of 2002.  Jessica holds an MFA in Ceramics from The Ohio State University and a BFA from The Kansas City Art Institute.

Her most recent work investigates the vessel as canvas and sculptural diorama.

Jessica resides in Philadelphia PA, where she is the Artist-In-Residence for Tyler School of Art at Temple University.

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Rachel Eng

Rachel Eng grew up exploring the deciduous forests around Rochester, NY and her fascination with the natural world continues today.  Drawing upon the ephemeral and immortal qualities of clay, her work considers aspects of the controlled and unpredictable in relation to our changing environment.  Her work often employs repetitive patterns and the use of multiple elements to create complex visual and textural experiences. “I have yet to completely understand where my predilection for the repetitive stems from, but it is always present in my work. The process of making many small parts has become meditative, the way to work through unattainable knowledge or obsessive memories.” Eng received her B.F.A. from Pennsylvania State University and her M.F.A. from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Personal Website: www.racheljeng.com

https://www.instagram.com/rje01/

 

 

 

 

Christina Erives

Christina Erives was born in 1989 in Los Angeles, California. She Received her Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in Studio Art from California State University of Northridge and her Master of Fine Arts from Pennsylvania State University. She is currently a Resident at Red Star/ Belger Crane Yard Studios in Kansas City. Erives’ work stems from her memories of growing up as one of twelve children in Los Angeles, California. Through the use of various objects, Erives constructs information rich installations that speak of her experiences as a Mexican-American.

 

https://www.instagram.com/christinamargaritaerives/

www.eriveschristina.com

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Brooks Oliver

Brooks Oliver currently is a studio artist based out of Dallas, Texas. H
recently completed a two-year, long-term residency at the Archie Bray Foundation in Helena, Montana. He has taught at West Virginia University, Penn State University, and the Archie Bray Foundation and served as a studio technician at multiple public and private studios.  He received a MFA in Studio Art at Penn State University in 2014 and a BFA from Southern Methodist University in 2010, and completed his post baccalaureate studies at Syracuse University in 2012.

Contact information

brooksboliver@gmail.com

Websites:

http://www.brooksoliver.com/

http://www.ro2art.com/brooks-oliver—bio.html

https://www.instagram.com/brooksoliver/

Wobble Vase 2015 Cast Porcelain Cone 10 oxidation 12x15x15 This vase is designed to wobble about

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Kate Roberts

Kate Roberts is native of Greenville, SC.  She received both her MFA and BFA from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University in 2015 and 2010 respectively.  She has completed residencies at the Archie Bray Foundation, Anderson Ranch Arts Center, and Le Cite International des Arts in Paris. This summer she will be participating in the Parcours Ceramique Carougeois Biennial in Geneva, Switzerland.  Currently she is a Lecturer of Ceramics at University of Washington-Seattle.

www.katerobertsceramics.com

Instagram is @katerobertsceramics

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Judd Schiffman

Judd Schiffman received his MFA from the University of Colorado, Boulder and is adjunct professor of ceramics and department technician at Providence College in Rhode Island. Judd remakes personal mementos and family heirlooms into sculpture, provoking questions about identity, physical objects and the experiences that comprise an individual life.

www.juddschiffman.com 

https://www.instagram.com/juddschiffman/

 

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Apply Now: NCECA EMERGING ARTISTS 2017

Apply Now: NCECA EMERGING ARTISTS 2017

The Emerging artist deadline is quickly approaching.  June 15. 2016

APPLY! Why not?!!!

This is going to be a very important year as we embark on the 51st year of NCECA’s history and the beginning of the next 50, with the Portland Conference already taking shape as “Future Flux”.

The process of creating and compiling the application and submitting the materials for this wonderful opportunity is an invaluable experience.  NCECA’s Emerging Artists program recognizes and highlights exceptional early career artists working in clay before a national and international audience during the annual conference.

The intent of the award is to recognize, cultivate and amplify vital, new voices of creative endeavor in ceramics. The award enables these artists to reach broader national and international audiences and impact discourse in the field.

 

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We are excited to announce the jurors………

for NCECA Emerging Artists 2017!!

Kim Dickey

Dickey explores how we construct environments both physically and psychologically while in response to what is natural vs. cultural, interior vs. exterior. The artist’s intensely assembled, glazed terracotta and porcelain works consist of many thousands of unique, yet seemingly uniform elements. Dickey creates reflexive sculptural landscapes that refer to their own construction while beguiling us toward an elaborate reverie. Using gardens as her reference, ordered plots in the natural world, Dickey freely reinterprets decorative ceramic traditions such as bocage: the closely clustered, miniature flowers traditionally used in the Rococo. The effect of such elements viewed in resplendent multiples is further visually amplified by her shifting palette and ignited image-making. Dickey’s theatrical sensibility and historically inspired forms, position her sculpture in the in-between space of presence and absence, the real and the ideal while mirroring past cultures and the natural world.

Artist and Professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder, Kim Dickey received her BFA from Rhode Island School of Design and her MFA from Alfred University. She has exhibited her work in museums such as: MASS MoCA (MA), the Everson Museum of Art (NY), the Museum of Arts and Design (NY), and the Contemporary Art Museum, Honolulu (HI), among others.

 

Tony Marsh

Long Beach, California-based potter Tony Marsh carefully creates and then deconstructs his ceramic vessels. Whether perforated or covered with protrusions, they are seldom without structural ornament. Early in his career, Marsh apprenticed in Mashiko, Japan with Tatsuzo Shimaoka, a potter known for his revival of ancient ceramic practices. Marsh’s training left him with an appreciation for formal technique and craft tradition, which he translates into his own creations that often resemble cellular structures, organisms, or other biomorphic forms.

“I am not really a potter although I admire them deeply in many ways. I understand pots as occupying what is for me a profound position between nature and culture. What I make is homage to my curiosity about the history of ceramic vessels and what they have always been called on to do: to preserve, to offer, to contain, to commemorate and to beautify.”

Tony Marsh earned a bachelor of fine arts in 1978 from California State University in Long Beach. He later traveled to Mashiko, Japan, to study at Shimaoka Pottery with Tatsuzo Shimaoka, whom Japan named a Living National Treasure in 1996. For three years, from 1978 to 1981, Marsh worked under the direction of Shimaoka as a worker, student, and apprentice. Marsh also worked with Shimaoka’s shokunin, or craftsmen, on a daily basis and was notably influenced by the traditional culture of the community.

Marsh was director of the Mendocino Art Center ceramics program from 1983 to 1985, and then lectured at California State University in Long Beach. He earned a master of fine arts in 1988 from New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University. In 1989 Marsh accepted a teaching position at California State University in Long Beach and is currently the chair of ceramics, a tenured appointment.

 

Jane Shellenbarger

My work with clay is mainly focused on utilitarian objects with deep and varied surface treatments, often including drawings and images that create a dialogue. The work considers the tipping point between elegance and awkwardness, questioning conventional beauty within historical forms, and where the familiar object becomes artifact.  My research embraces multiple histories and the nuanced and complex relationship we have with objects in our everyday lives.

Jane received her B.F.A. degree from the Kansas City Art Institute, and her M.F.A. from Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville.  Currently, she is an Assistant Professor at Rochester Institute of Technology in the School for American Crafts.

Jane has exhibited her work in several galleries around the country including; Leslie Ferrin Gallery, Lacoste Gallery, Lill Street, AKAR Gallery, Sante Fe Clay, Philadelphia Clay Studio, Red Lodge Clay Center and Baltimore Clayworks among others. Her work is in the public collections of the Renwick Gallery of the National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., The Ohi Museum, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan, The Archie Bray Foundation for the Ceramic Arts, San Angelo Museum of Fine Art.

 

As one of NCECA’s Directors-at-Large, I am charged with the wonderful opportunity to create a jury to select six emerging artists. I always try to balance the jury with sculptors, vessel makers, as I am a utilitarian potter and act as the 3rd juror.  I try to reach out to exceptional artists that have a broad perspective on the field.

Officially Announcing the 2016 Emerging Artists

Officially Announcing the 2016 Emerging Artists

The National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts has selected the 2016 Emerging Artists. This year’s applicant pool was outstanding, which made it that much more challenging for the jurors to make our final selections.

The selection committee, Jim Melchert, Eva Kwong, and Jane Shellenbarger had a difficult task of reviewing the applications from a diverse cross section of artists from the U.S. and abroad. We had very thoughtful and focused discussion over the applications.  We had to make some very difficult decisions and choices to identify the 6 artists to represent this years Emerging Artists.  They represent exceptional early-career artists, who have developed an authentic and personal body of work and we strongly believe that they will make a significant contribution to our field.

We are excited to announce a diverse and exciting pool of talented ceramic artists deserving of this important recognition.

joanna poagJoanna Poag grew up primarily in the Rochester, NY area. She received her MFA from the School for American Crafts at RIT and her BS from Roberts Wesleyan College. She is currently Assistant Professor of Art at Roberts Wesleyan College in Rochester, NY.

kyungmin parkKyungmin Park is originally from South Korea, Kyungmin Park earned a B.F.A in 2006 from Alfred University and an M.F.A in 2012 from the University of Georgia. Kyungmin was a summer resident at the Archie Bray Foundation in 2014. Currently, she is a 2015 Matsutani / 2016 Windgate Fellow at the Archie Bray.

peter morgan 2Peter Morgan is a native son of Virginia, currently based in Pennsylvania.   He has exhibited throughout the United States and Europe, and notable residencies include the Clay Studio and the Archie Bray Foundation. When he is not in the studio, he is an avid bird watcher, runs marathons.

tom jaszerchekTom Jaszczak  received a BA in visual Art and a BS in biology from Bemidji State University.  Tom was an assistant for Simon Levin and Tara Wilson.  Tom was a summer resident and a Long-Term resident at the Archie Bray Foundation.  In the fall of 2015 Tom began a 3 year residency with his wife Maggie Finlayson at Penland School of Crafts.

kwokpong TsoKwok Pong Tso was born and raised in Hong Kong. At age 17, he moved to the USA  and  begins  to  explore  the  culture  while  continuing  his  education.  In  2009  he  completed the undergraduate art program at Iowa Central Community College and Northwest Missouri State University. After receiving his Master of Fine Art degree at  the  University  of  Iowa,  2013,  He  then  become  the  Assistant  Professor  of  art at  Northwest  Missouri  State  University,  teaching  all  level  of  Ceramics  classes,  and  act as the head of the Ceramics Area.

sean o'connellSean O’Connell is a potter and Lecturer at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.  He was previously a Visiting Faculty member at the Alberta College of Art & Design and a resident at the Archie Bray Foundation. He earned his MFA from the Rochester Institute of Technology and his BFA at the Kansas City Art Institute.

 

You can see the work of all of the Emerging Artists at the Leedy Voulkos Gallery during NCECA, reception on Thursday Evening, and hear their presentations on Saturday morning at the conference!


About the selection committee members:

Jim Melchert has been at the center of the Bay Area’s artistic growth and served as Visual Arts head at the NEA and Director of the American Academy at Rome. His work has been exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Oakland Museum of California, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, and the University Art Museum at UC Berkeley. Melchert has worked in a variety of media, including drawing, film, and ceramics. The path of his artistic development is conceptual, and his ideas led him to a unique process involving ceramic tiles: breaking them, drawing on them, reassembling them and painting the new constructions with glaze.

Jim Melchert was born in 1930 in Ohio. After his undergraduate studies in art history at Princeton he taught English in Japan for four years in exchange for the rich experience of living there. Returning to the States he earned degrees in painting at the University of Chicago and afterwards ceramics under Peter Voulkos at the University of California, Berkeley. Finding the Bay Area to be receptive to artists in the way that watering holes are to migratory birds, he settled in Oakland and thrived on the interaction among his colleagues and young artists at UC-Berkeley where he taught.  In 1977 the National Endowment for the Arts brought him to Washington, DC to direct its Visual Arts Program for four years. From 1984 to 1988 he joined the American Academy in Rome as Director.

One can see from the diversity of Melchert’s art work that he is a maverick who disregards many of the canons that define disciplines. His travels throughout the Mediterranean in the 1980s introduced him to ceramic tile as a medium ripe for further investigation. Among the places where his work has been exhibited are the Whitney Museum and the Museum of Art and Design in New York; the Museums of Contemporary Art in Chicago, Houston, and Los Angeles; the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston; at the Museums of Modern Art in San Francisco, Tokyo, and Kyoto; The Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and Documenta 5 in Kassel, Germany.

Jim-Melchert

Eva Kwong is known for her sensuous, colorful, large and small scale ceramic sculptures, vessels and installations inspired by her longtime interest in the organic forms and colors she sees in nature. Kwong’s glazes can range from subtle greens and browns to bright primary colors. Her thrown and hand built stoneware pieces are often provocative exploring the concept of opposites. Kwong is most well known for her ceramics but she has also made prints.  A formal quality beautifully explored in Eva Kwong’s work is balance. To have it one needs more than one thing.

Eva Kwong  has a BFA from Rhode Island School of Esign and a MFA from Tyler School of Art, Philadelphia, 1977, and worked at Archie Bray.

She has received numerous awards including fellowships: the Pennsylvania Council on the arts, two from Ohio Arts Council, two from the Virginia Commission on the Arts, and one from the National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship. She took a 2nd place prize at Viewpoints Ceramic 2001.

She exhibited in 8th International Shoebox sculpture, the National Ceramics Biennial, and the Millennium End Invitational in Beijing. Her work is in the permanent collection of the Mint Museum, an the Studio Potter website of significant pottery. She has had solo exhibits at Ruschman Art Gallery in

Indianapolis and the University of Michigan among others. She contributed to the Achie Bray Foundation Auction, exhibited at Wayne State University, Boise State University, Montgomery College, the Wooster Museum, Bowling State U, Scripps College, and other venues. Her work has been featured in Art & Perception 1995. She was listed by the Getty Art Museum Arts Education program as one of America’s most significant ceramic artists.

She has been a visiting artist at Ohio State University, University of Wisconsin, in Manchester, England, RISD, the Art Institute of Chicago, Cranbrook, Penland, Arrowmont, and at the South Australia Art Gallery. She has served as a juror for major ceramic prizes and fellowships and been a presenter at MI Mud.

Her work is or has been handled by Solomen Dubnik Gallery, William Busta Gallery, Hyde Gallery, The Clay Place.& Northern Clay Center.

Eva Kwong is known for her sensuous, colorful, large and small scale ceramic sculptures, vessels and installations inspired by her longtime interest in the organic forms and colors she sees in nature. Kwong’s glazes can range from subtle greens and browns to bright primary colors. Her thrown and hand built stoneware pieces are often provocative exploring the concept of opposites. Kwong is most well known for her ceramics but she has also made prints.  A formal quality beautifully explored in Eva Kwong’s work is balance. To have it one needs more than one thing.

eva kwong 2

Jane Shellenbarger,  is an assistant professor of Ceramics at RIT and serves on the Board of Directors of  NCECA as a director at large. She was a resident artist at the Archie Bray

Foundation.  She has been invited to teach, demonstrate Ceramics, and lecture internationally at such prestigious venues as Kansas City Art Institute, Haystack, Penland, San Bao Ceramic Art

Institute in Jingdezhen, China. Her work is exhibited around the world, and in the public collections of the Renwick Gallery of the National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., the San Angelo Museum of Fine Art, and Kanazawa Nakamura Memorial Museum, Japan

Jane’s studio practice has focused on utilitarian objects with deep and varied surface treatments, often including drawings and images that create a dialogue. Her work considers the tipping point between elegance and awkwardness, questioning conventional beauty within historical forms, and where the familiar object becomes artifact.  Her research embraces multiple histories and the nuanced and complex relationship we have with objects in our everyday lives.

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Meet the 2015 Emerging Artists

Meet the 2015 Emerging Artists

I am thrilled to introduce you to this year’s six NCECA Emerging Artists.  The artists that submitted work created an incredibly strong pool of talent.  The jurors deliberated over their applications. Ultimately, we selected artists that had found a very personal direction with their work and had achieved a technical conceptual voice that has the potential to add a significant contribution to the field.  Read on to get acquainted and enjoy the images of their work, then make plans to get to know them better at the conference!  You can connect with them:

  • • on Wednesday at their individual artist talks in the Emerging Artist are, adjacent to the Gallery Expo,

  • • during the Topical Discussion session, “Maintaining an Authentic Voice” on Thursday at 5:15pm in room 555/556 

  • • on Saturday morning at 9:00am during the Emerging Artists presentation, immediately preceding the Closing Lecture.

My creative process is cultivated through identity exploration and self-discovery. My practice is a combination of risk taking and experimentation. It includes both the artistic process and a constantly shifting personal narrative. In the studio, critical thinking and problem solving are directly linked to the exploration of individuality. Places inhabited, people encountered, and investigations of materials and process influence content, giving form to the concepts of my creative identity.

-David Bogus, www.davidbogus.com, artist talk 12:00-12:20 Wednesday


My current body of work follows an autobiographical inquiry into the formal relationships that personally significant objects and relics undergo when subjected to the downward pull of gravity. Gravity in this context serves as a metaphor for individual responsibility and the stress we encounter in present society.
Beginning with this premise, I embrace the deconstruction of objects familiar to my history as a ceramic artist.  Components are created and then bonded through an accumulation of porcelain casting slip, texturing work, underglaze, glaze, and luster applications in multiple firings.  The resulting compositions are often combined with mixed media additions to complement conceptual methodology.

-Andrew Casto, www.andrewcasto.com, artist talk 12:20-12:40 Wednesday


As a mold maker, I design and construct a form, make a mold from it, and predictably repeat that form, harnessing the power of the multiple. As a slip caster, I use porcelain to cast these objects and then collaborate with the kiln. As a print maker, I utilize the interior surface of the mold as my block, building layers of information with colored slip. As a story teller, I draw inspiration from my environments and my own personal history. I arrange multiple components into a single piece—placing these objects in space allowing the viewers a moment of pause in the quiet environments that I create or asking them to consider an element in the landscape that may have otherwise gone unnoticed.

-Rachel K. Garceau, rachelkgarceau.comartist talk 12:40-1:00 Wednesday


My experiences as an indigent minority inform my version of Puerto Rican American history. With my education in critical theory, art education, art history, and studio art I have developed a studio practice that fluidly communicates with diverse audiences. I bring art to those that do not believe they need to see it and engage in deeper ways of knowing, learning and thinking.

-Roberto Lugo, robertolugostudio.wordpress.comartist talk 4:00-4:20 Wednesday


The process of coiling and pinching clay gives volume and mass to my thoughts. The marks left in the surface are the indelible record of this method. Through its material affordances, porcelain has an uncomplicated way of encoding the marks of my hands, storing and recalling those actions to the world on its surface. Material exploration assists my constructions of perceptions of time, narrative and self through the juxtaposition of the tangible and permanent characteristics of clay with the ephemeral nature of light and shadow. I am concerned with the exploration of humanistic ideas about presence, relationships, memory and mortality

-Kelly O’Briant, www.kellyobriant.com,  artist talk 4:20-4:40 Wednesday


I find beauty in my embarrassment.
I welcome the silly.

Through the arrangement of objects I set up a situation or narrative where the viewer can forget about an object’s function and call attention to its possibilities as pure matter, with its own intentions. I want to encourage questions about what is happening with the objects and the narrative being peculiar and unclear welcomes this conversation

-Joanna Powell, www.joannapowellstudio.comartist talk 4:40-5:00 Wednesday

International Residency Applications Due!

International Residency Applications Due!

Happy New Year NCECA members! 2015 will be an amazing year for NCECA and particularly for our International Residency Partner Program. The deadline for these applications is fast approaching!!!

DEADLINE: February 3!

This year, NCECA has joined forces with C.R.E.T.A. Rome, Rome, Italy and the Yingge Ceramic Museum, New Taipei City, Tiawan.

Both of these respected programs offer excellent facilities and a stimulating creative space to pursue experimental directions in your work, or possibly a project that is inspired by a new studio environment and exposure to a new culture. Both are fantastic opportunities and researching each of these residency centers will allow you to determine which would be a better fit for your proposal.

NCECA’s partnership with these ceramic centers supports the residency awardees with a substantial financial award as well as our residency partners providing in-kind support.

Our goal in doing this is to lessen the financial burden on the artists, and clarify a funding model for this program that reflected an equitable partnership between NCECA and our residency hosts.

One artist will be selected by each of this year’s residency partners, and NCECA will support each artist up to $3750 towards residency costs including travel. Residency hosts will provide $1500.00 of in-kind support that should defer much of the remaining residency costs.

Yingge Ceramic Museum is offering a 4 week residency. For more information on the Yingge opportunity, read here

C.R.E.T.A. Rome is offering a six-week residency, For more information on the C.R.E.T.A  opportunity, read here

Both of these must be scheduled within the timeframe specified by each residency host.  All details about the residency program and application process are listed on NCECA’s website.

This opportunity is another way that NCECA is working to provide value for your membership in our organization. The lucky artists selected for these two opportunities will undoubtedly have an

unforgettable experience working abroad. Our ultimate goal is to promote the ceramic arts and education on a global level, and encourage a rich cultural exchange for our members and partners abroad.

Don’t forget, the deadline to apply is February 3!


 

Last year’s great residency locations:

The Banff Centre in Banff, Canada and the European Ceramic Workcentre in ‘s-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands.

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